Domestic & Intimate Partner Violence

Intimate Partner Violence is a focus included in cross-system prevention strategy to support children, family health and well-being that represents a significant public health issue that has considerable societal costs. Supporting the  development of healthy, respectful, and nonviolent relationships has the potential to reduce the occurrence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and prevent its harmful and long-lasting effects on individuals, families, and the communities where they live. 

Happy Couple

The strategies and approaches identified here represent the best available evidence to address the  problem of IPV. It is based on research which suggests that the strategies and approaches described have demonstrated  impact on rates of IPV or on risk and protective factors for IPV. Violence between intimate partners is a costly public health issue, but it is also preventable. Through continued research and evaluation of promising approaches for preventing IPV, we can strengthen our understanding of how to support healthy relationships between intimate partners and alleviate the burden of IPV to society as a whole.

Key Note

IPV is connected to other forms of violence. Experience with many other forms of violence puts people at risk for  perpetrating and experiencing IPV. Children who are exposed to IPV between their parents or caregivers are more likely to perpetrate or experience IPV, as are individuals who experience abuse and neglect as children.1,2,3  An emphasis on implementing and creating safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments in childhood and adolescence to prevent IPV across the lifespan. Approaches such as social-emotional learning, early childhood home visitation, preschool enrichment, parenting skill and family relationship programs, and efforts to create protective environments and lessen harms are intended to address 

exposures to violence, build skills, strengthen relationships, and create the context to prevent IPV across the lifespan.

Strategies and approaches are intended to work in combination and reinforce each other to prevent IPV (see box below). While individual skills are important and research has demonstrated  preventive effects in reducing IPV, approaches addressing peer, family, school and other environments as well as societal factors are equally important for a comprehensive approach that can have the greatest public health impact.

Supporting the development of healthy, respectful, and nonviolent relationships has the potential to reduce the occurrence of IPV and prevent its harmful and long-lasting effects on individuals, families, and the communities where they live.

2017
Division of Violence Prevention
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Georgia

References:

1. Capaldi, D. M., Knoble, N. B., Shortt, J. W., & Kim, H. K. (2012). A systematic review of risk factors for intimate partner violence. Partner Abuse, 3(2), 231-80.

2. Vagi, K. J., Rothman, E. F., Latzman, N. E., Tharp, A. T., Hall, D. M., & Breiding, M. J. (2013). Beyond correlates: a review of risk and protective factors for adolescent dating violence perpetration. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 42(4), 633-649.

3. Temple, J. R., Shorey, R. C., Tortolero, S. R., Wolfe, D. A., & Stuart, G. L. (2013). Importance of gender and attitudes about violence in the relationship between exposure to interparental violence and the perpetration of teen dating violence. Child Abuse & Neglect, 37(5):343-352.